We are all unique, which means that we should find a way to appreciate and tolerate the differences between us. While some of you crave for company these days, others are perfectly peaceful, on their own, and enjoy the tranquility of their home.

Psychology has two terms for this: introverts and extroverts. The first group involves people that tend to be alone, quiet, reserved, thoughtful, and do not seek any social engagements.

Extroverts love having the spotlight and being among crowds, enjoy conversations and interactions, and thrive in the frenzy of a busy environment.

However, introverts are somehow against the social expectation of what’s normal and what’s not, so they are often misunderstood or have to explain themselves.

According to some psychologists, somewhere between 16-50% of the world’s population are introverts. This means that up to half of us have brains that are wired differently from extroverts, and might feel isolated, misunderstood, and left out in the society.

While the amount of the “feel-good” hormone, dopamine, is the same in both, extroverts and introverts, the brain of introverts responds differently to it. Namely, their brain does not need as much dopamine to feel happy and might feel overwhelmed after too much social time.

Moreover, it responds more to another “feel-good” neurotransmitter, acetylcholine, that sends “happy” signals during more introspective activities than outward stimuli.

Introverts enjoy their time alone while reflecting and focusing, and they do not need to stay entertained or happy, as they have highly developed creative or analytical skills.

Yet, many see them as boring, judgmental, or anxious. The truth is, introverts simply enjoy the peace, and their own company, which makes them quite special.

Loners are very self-aware, loyal, and respectful. They won’t tolerate fake people, schemes, or arguments, as they highly appreciate their time.

Here are four personality traits of introverts:

  • They have developed self-care, and they are caring and loyal friends, partners, parents, and co-workers. However, even though they avoid larger crowds, they deeply engage themselves in building one-on-one connections with people they like. Not to mention, they are very observant and excellent listeners.
  • They spend a lot of time in introspection, so they have a rich mental life and value their thoughts, even though they do not feel it necessary to share them with others. Many of them are more prone to writing than speaking, and they have a strong focus and willpower.
  • They are not shy, do not have a social anxiety disorder, and are not afraid of engaging with new people. They just don’t feel the constant urge to be in someone else’s company or to seek social interactions. These individuals set clear ideals and values, and exercise strong and healthy boundaries in their relationships.
  • Introverts need more time to recharge, as they grow tired faster than extroverts. They need some alone space to clear their mind, disconnect from the world and reset their focus, and this is crucial for their survival.

The more you learn and know about introverts, the easier it becomes to understand them, recognize their virtues, and appreciate their uniqueness.

Source:
dailyinformator.com